Skip to main content

About your Search

20120501
20120531
STATION
KQED (PBS) 155
SPONSOR
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 155 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
May 5, 2012 12:00am PDT
maybe more so than the great majority. and in relation to the united states government, whether it is the clinton administration or bush administration or obama administration, they're probably better understood stood more like francement they're sometime as lined with the united states, sometimes o posed. postly they are just trying to stay out of the way and do their own thing. >> ann bremmer and steve coll when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: . >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders:. >> and by bloomberg:. >> from studios in new york city captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: ian bremmer is here president of eurasia group, his new book every nation for itself, winners and losers in a g-zero world t paints a picture in a world in which no single power is able to take be the responsibility of global leadership. larry summers says everyone who cares about our collective future will need to carefully consider this book's impressive arguments. i'm pleased to have i
PBS
Apr 30, 2012 6:00pm PDT
united states almost three years ago i could not find one that worked for me. i became inspired to bring a new definition of quality to the world. today it's working to fulfill our mission of bringing omega 3s to everyone because omega 3s are essential to life. >> citi turns 200 this year. in that time, there have been some good days and some difficult ones. but through it all, we persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. >> bnsf railway. >. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the mystery surrounding an escaped chinese dissident deepened today as u.s. officials took pains to say as
PBS
May 31, 2012 12:00am PDT
opposes not only the united states, any kind of control and domination, including the authoritarian leadership? the region and i think's uncertainty now but once the dust settles in the arab world you're going to have a new world. a new world that basically will not accept america's dominance. >> rose: rumsfeld and gerges when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: donald rumsfeld is here he was secretary of defense under president george w. bush from 2000 to 2006. he resigned in the midst ofest schrating public criticism of the iraq war. rumsfeld began his career in the 1960s as a three-term congressman from illinois. he joined president richard nixon's cabinet and served under presidents ford, reagan and bush 43. his memoir "known and unknown" is now out in paper back and it chronicles everything as his time as a middle east envoy to one of the president's closestt% foreign policy advisors. as the u.s. ends tour two wars and faces turmoil in the middle east, i'm pleased to have donald rumsfeld back
PBS
May 30, 2012 2:30pm PDT
action is necessary now. the united states needs to be a part of it. >> liberia's former president gets a 50-year sentence for war crimes described as some of the most heinous in history. and greenback the bookstore -- bringing back the bookstore, one well-known author is stocking the shelves in hopes of bringing back the written page. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and elsewhere around the world. tonight, fresh evidence of the breach in the u.n. broken cease- fire in syria. 13 bodies, apparently executed, were found in the eastern part of the country. the killings were discovered that even as the u.n. security council held a closed meeting on last week's massacre that left more than 100 dead and sparked widespread condemnation of the assad regime. >> another mass killing. the commander of the u.s. observer team in syria, general mahmoud, said the bodies of the 13 men with hallett -- with hands bound were found shot dead on tuesday. he calls the appalling and inexcusable. it is the second time in less than a week that the u.n. monitors have validated the claims and videos put ou
PBS
May 3, 2012 7:00pm PDT
week negotiators from eight nations will join the united states in dallas for talks on a new trade agreement. you know what that means, right, usu.s. negotiators want access o hundreds of consoomplez. darren gersh reports tonight it could be some of the last jobs left here at home making shoes. >> tom, when you buy athletic shoes, you probably don't know it but you're most likely paying somewhere between 5 and $15 in what's called an import tariff. a tax on imported shoes to protecting jobs in the united states. and that tariff has set off a sneaker war. on one side there's new balance, the last company to make athletic shoes in the united states. on the other side you'll find retailers and companies like nike. they design shoes in the united states. but they manufacture them in countries like vietnam. >> we have a 1930's tariff structure in the 21st century, and that is really ham perking our awe -- hampering our ability to grow jobs. >> the obama administration is working on a new trade deal with vietnam and other countries called the transpacific partnership. as the world's fast
PBS
May 30, 2012 4:00pm PDT
, in the united states needs to be a part of it. charles taylor gets a bit the- year sentence for war crimes described as some of the most heinous in history. in the digital age, bringing back the good-old fashioned bookshop. er inlcome to our view mirro around the world. 13 bodies apparently executed were found in the eastern part of syria. the killings were discovered even as the u.n. security council held a meeting on last week's massacre that left more than 100 people dead and sparked wide-right combination of the regime. james robbins starts our coverage. >> no sign of the plea for peace in syria being heated. our creeks of violence in different parts of the country. -- outbreaks of violence in different parts of the country. last friday's massacre took place in houla. >> the syrian government, people are extremely troubled with this heinous and unjustified terrorist killing that took place and houla. today and other massacre was uncovered. -- today another massacre was uncovered. some were shot at close range. the fears that violence could spread through the region. >> in th
PBS
May 2, 2012 6:00pm PDT
thing to do. >> meanwhile, the chinese government demand an apology from the united states. the foreign minister said: in the meantime, security was tight outside the hospital where chen is being treated, and the hospital's name was quickly banned as a search term on the chinese internet. we take a closer look now at this still unfolding story with shao chung, director of the berkeley-china internet project at u.c. berkeley, and editor of the "china digital times," an online publication. and evan osnos, who's written on chen guangcheng and other dissidents as the china correspondent for the "new yorker" magazine. he joins us tonight from the campus of stanford university. os, i'll start with you. what do you make of this very confusing series of events today? is there any way to unravel what's known at this point? >> well, it's been an extraordinary 24 hours. the story is very dynamic. a few hours ago, frankly, all of us thought that the u.s. government, the chinese side, had reached perhaps the best available solution given the moment, which was to create an opportunity for che
PBS
May 9, 2012 3:00pm PDT
think this is a huge positive step for them to say, okay, well the president of the united states thinks this is an important thing and he wanted to affirm it. then on top of that, if we ever have something go to the supreme court, i think it will be very important what the highest office holder in our land thinks about same-sex marriage as well as the polling, as well as how many states have legalized it. we like to pretend that the supreme court lives in a bubble but they do not. those justices live among us. >> woodruff: kerry eleveld, thank you very much. >> thank you. we get two views now on the president's announcement and its significance. evan wolfson is the president and founder of freedom to marry, a leading organization seeking to legalize same-sex marriage in states around the country. and the reverend harry jackson is senior pastor of hope christian church in beltsville, maryland, presiding bishop of the international communion of evangelical churches, and an outspoken opponent of gay marriage. reverend jackson, what does it mean to you what the president said? >> well, i be
PBS
May 4, 2012 8:00pm PDT
want to go to the united states so he can pursue his studies. over the course of the day, progress has been made to help him have the future that he wants, and we will be staying in touch with -- gwen: so who is chen quangcheng and how did he end up in the middle of a debate between two of the world's super powers? >> it was a whiplash week. we all thought this was solved, that he would stay in china in the middle of the week, but alas, by the end of the week he's going to come to the united states. let me backtrack a little bit, a lit bit more about chen. human rights activist, as you said, blind, so dramatic this week, because he escaped. he had been under house arrest for a couple of years. before that he was in prison. he was with his wife and young daughter in this house. in a rural province in china. and in the middle of the night he certainly used his blindness, because he is used to darkness and his guards weren't. he played sick for a few weeks, so they were not really looking after him that well. climbed over a wall, through a field, through a river, felt his way around.
PBS
May 28, 2012 12:00pm PDT
assassinationment now he is in the united states to attend the peabody awards where a documenteer called bhutto is being honored. a visit to new york and his father's visit to chicago for the g8 comes at a difficult time in pakistani u.s. relations there is tension over a 33 year sentence given to a doctor without allegedly helped the cia identify some of bin laden's location. >> the united states does not believe there is any basis for holding dr. afridi. we regret both fact that he was con contribute-- convicted and the severity of his sentence. his help, after all, was instrumental in taking down one of the world's most notorious murderers, that was clearly in pakistan's interests as well as ours and the rest of the world. this action by dr. afridi to help bring about the end of the reign of terror designed and executed by bin laden was not in any way a betrayal of pakistan. and we have made that vi well-known and we will continue to press it with the government of pakistan. >> rose: there are also tensions over the deaths of 24 pakistani soldiers during a nato raid and over access to
PBS
May 21, 2012 4:00pm PDT
and pakistan, the united states and pakistan. >> progress may not be free of blood shed. the warm and not really end. only the fighting will be done by afghan forces. they want to assure them that when they stand up, they will not stand alone. >> we're making an enduring commitment to the long-term future of afghanistan. the message to the afghan people is we will not desert them. the message to the insurgency is equally clear. you cannot win on the battlefield. he should stop fighting and start talking. >> the summit is intended to mark a milestone. the journey is far from over. nato is planning in a supporting role in afghanistan even as it prepares to clear the war is over. bbc news in chicago. >> for more on the strategy emerging from the summit, i am joined by prof. of international politics and former adviser in the u.s. state department. they are not short of optimism. at the end of the day, leaving afghanistan does not mean the end of the war. will the afghan forces really be able to cope? >> i do not think so, largely because we're dealing with a force that does not have much
PBS
May 8, 2012 6:00pm PDT
will continue to work hard to inflict damage to the united states. fortunately, our intelligence community and the c.i.a. have their eyes on the ball in yemen and it's a great success what they were able to do in the last 24 hours. >> warner: michael leiter, let me ask you, when john brenner said today "this i.e.d. was a threat from the standpoint of the design," what is he talking about? >> well, this bomb and also the bomb that the bomb maker asiri is probably responsible for back in 2009, the first underwear bomb and then the printer cartridges bombs that were detected in 2010 represent a real challenge for screening. with no metal pieces at all, a standard magnetometer, metal detector, won't detect that. so what you have to have instead are much more advanced screening techniques at airports to find that. fliers see that all the time here in the united states now. they're less prevalent overseas. of course we need to make sure the same techniques that we know are working here are applied overseas as well. what i would also add, margaret, is none of these detection methods are
PBS
May 29, 2012 3:00pm PDT
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: the united states and other nations expelled syrian diplomats today, expressing outrage over the weekend massacre. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the newshour tonight, we have an on-the-ground report from the city of homs, and an interview with ambassador gary dewer from canada, one of the countries taking action against its syrian envoy. >> woodruff: then, two takes on the presidential race. we look at mitt romney as he secures the republican nomination after today's primary in texas. >> warner: and gwen ifill reports on the push by both campaigns to court hispanics. >> immigration is a big issue, but not the top concern for hispanic voters here in colorado and elsewhere. both governor romney and president obama are talking about the economy. >> woodruff: plus, ray suarez examines the use of drone strikes to target al qaeda militants, and president obama's hand in approving the list of terrorists to kill. >> warner: and as author toni morrison is awarded the presidential medal o
PBS
May 20, 2012 3:30pm PDT
he's in office because of a feeling that the united states abused his victory in the cold war, we moved nato in his face. we bombed serbia, we had a bunch every american advisors go there and help the -- john, russia is a natural ally of the united states and my judgment for this reason -- we have two potential adversaries coming, one is islamic world and the other is china. russia is as i say a natural ally because they have the same adversaries and i agree with obama, should you make an effort really to befriend or treat these people as equals and don't treat them the way we've ia $0obeen treating them the end of the cold war. >> putin issued apache to his ministers telling them to pursue amicable relations with the u.s. the contrast between the campaign rhetoric and the official marching orders could not be greater. >> good reason for both. when you -- there's a lot of hostility to the united states within the russian community. the russian people. and so if you're campaigning future re-election, which putin was, you certainly want to exploit that. now that he's governing, it b
PBS
May 17, 2012 12:00pm PDT
. bush. he also served as an officer in the united states air force. after 26 years at the c.i.a. and national security council, he became president of texas and, a, many university. in 2006, president george w. bush appointed him sex tear of defense succeeding donald rumsfeld. under his watch, gates oversaw iraq's troop surge. president-elect obama asked him to stay in the job. he became the first defense secretary to serve both a republican and democratic president. in the obama administration he played a pivotal role in shaping u.s. policy in afghanistan. he was a key player in the decision to send additional forces into the country. he was at the center of the debate on the raid to kill osama bin laden last may. gates stepped down as defense secretary in june, 2011. here is what president obama said at gates' farewell ceremony. >> what you see is a man that i've come to know and respect. a humble american patriot. a man of common sense and decency. quite simply one of our nation's finest public servants. >> reporter: i talked with bob gates in williamsburg virginia at the college
PBS
May 1, 2012 3:00pm PDT
about how the united states will remain here. this agreement basically says that we commit ourselves to supporting afghanistan economically, you know, we'll support its development and we will retain a number of troops here in a counterterrorism role in the post 2014 environment. mostly those to chase after what's left of al qaeda. but this is a... signifies sort of a long-term commitment of the united states to afghanistan and more broadly to the region. >> ifill: even in the negotiating of this agreement, there have been tensions. of course we have documented all the tensions in the u.s.-afghan relationship specifically with president karzai. was any of that in evidence today? >> not really. i think president karzai got pretty much what he wanted for his own domestic audience. his contingency. let's not forget that we had these very controversial night raids that they wanted the afghans to take the lead on. we signed a memorandum of understanding with the afghan government on know. there was a detainee issue which was a big sticking point, a memorandum of understanding was signed o
PBS
May 6, 2012 5:00pm PDT
united states. the living room was mexico. walter cronkite was the ambassador to both countries. >> funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new york. celebrating 100 years of philanthropy and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the colberg foundation, independent production fund with support from the partridge foundation, a john and holly guf charitable fund. the clement foundation, park foundation dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb albert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audrey rappaport foundation, the john d. and katherine t. mcarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. and gumowitz, the hkh foundation, barbara g. fleishmann and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america. designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we are your retirement company. >> welcome. there is no stretch of territory in the world quite like the
PBS
May 1, 2012 6:00pm PDT
historic agreement between the united states and afghanistan that defines a new kind of relation between our countries. a future in which afghans are responsible for the security of their nation and we build an equal partnership between two sovereign states. a future in which war ends and a new chapter begins. tonight i'd like to speak to you about this transition. but first, let us remember why we came here. it was here in afghanistan where osama bin laden established a safe haven for his terrorist organization. it was here in afghanistan where al qaeda brought new recruits, trained them, and plotted acts of terror. it was here from within these borders that al qaeda launched the attacks that killed nearly 3,000 innocent men, women, and children. and so ten years ago, the united states and our allies went to war to make sure that al qaeda coulnever again use this country to launch attacks against us. despite initial success, for a number of reasons, this war has taken longer than most anticipated. in 2002 bin laden and his lieutenants escaped across the border and established safe haven
PBS
May 1, 2012 12:00am PDT
" columnist in, and princeton professor paul krugman. >> in the united states, this is not as bad as the depression. however, it shares the feature of the great depression. most of the time period we call the great depression the economy was actually growing. but it wasn't growing fast enough to bring down that terrible unemployment rate at all quickly. same now. further more, the economic logic, the special feature of depression economics is that the federal reserve can't do its usual thing, can't just cut interest rates because the interest rates it controls directly are already at zero which has all kinds of implications. it means that things like fiscal austerity, ordinarily if the government spends less that doesn't have to cause a recession because the fed can cut interest rates to offset that. but it can't do that now. so all of the logic of how economic policy works changes. we are qualitativefully the same situation we were in in the 30s. quantitatively it's not as bad but it has that same underlying logic. >> rose: paul krugman for the hour. next. captioning sponsored by rose c
PBS
May 24, 2012 6:00pm PDT
, what is the european scenario that the united states should be most worried about? >> oh, goodness. i mean, there's really a cliff there. there's a possibility the whole euro can dissolve if they don't take a quantum leap towards unification and we could have a layman moment again. it's not... lehman moment again. it's not hyperbole to say that. they've seen that in europe. they can't agree among themselves what is are they going to do when greece leaves which is the equivalent of lehman going under in the united states. >> and josh bivens, even short of the worst-case scenario, the u.s. is already feeling the effects of what's happening in europe. >> i think that's right. i think slow grooet in europe and now it looks like outright contraction in a lot of europe is meaning we export less. i would say over the last year, over the coming year if they're in a recession, we're probably talking about less than half a percentage point of g.d.p. knocked off our growth rate because of european troubles but given the growth rate is slow already, those are precious little percentage points tha
PBS
May 3, 2012 4:00pm PDT
shaping up to be a diplomatic debacle of catastrophic proportions. yes, the united states administration and the diplomatic core may have preserved the relationship with china, but at what price? i think for people who are concerned about human rights, people are concerned about the united states reputation as a beacon to preserve human rights this is looking like a pretty amateurish move. it's quite troubling, actually. >> what your cover story suggests is this has implications almost beyond the square episode because of the relationship being so much more integrated between china and the sthust >> yeah, there is no going back. back even a generation ago, china was not a major player on the world stage. it wasn't the second largest g.d.p., so if china decided that it want to be a bit more her metic or pull back, the stakes weren't as big. now the stakes are gigantic. it's not only the world's largest country, but it's much more forceful on the global stage. this has far reaching ramifications, much more possibly than teenman square. >> the recent scandal seemed to point to weaknesses wi
PBS
May 24, 2012 4:00pm PDT
the democracies to come, they waited for the cavalry, if they waited for the united states to make the decision and the united states hid behind the opposition of russia and china at the united nations security council. now we find ourselves in this desperate moment. i'm very dubious about this whole story about the promise of jihadists. but the responsibility is borne by the democracy. >> you have just returned from turkey and you have been to the refugee camps along the turkish- syrian border. did you find any willing was in turkey from syria's neighbor that they do something about what's happening across the border? >> these refugee camps are the home of the true historian of the rebellion. that is where you get educated about what is happening in these last accrual 15 months. the answer as to whether they are ready to do the right thing by the rebellion, i think there is readiness to take the risk, but everyone is waiting for barack obama and everyone is waiting for the united states. they will not do anything without american support. the libyans report -- the libyans support
PBS
May 7, 2012 7:00pm PDT
reaction here in the united states. european leaders talked up the need for more economic growth today. darren gersh reports the likely forecast is more uncertainty. >> for only the second time in 50 years a socialist has been elected president of france. francoise hollande's victory this weekend is a clear rejection of the measures put in place to jolt the euro. >> this is an a cute phase of the silver and debt crisis. >> two main parties that had managed the party through the debt crisis emerged from parliamentary elections with less than a third of the combined vote. that could leave greece in limbo unable to form a new government. >> greece and france have rejected what is going on and how the incumbent leaders have dealt with the debt crisis. >> this is a potent gentially disrupt full mix for markets. >> jittery and uncertainty higher than ever. >> this is following an ominous pattern. those looking to clean up problems could lead to years and decades of growth. there is a fear there will be a spill over to the united states. >> the u.s. has a fiscal problem. but it's a medium to
PBS
May 15, 2012 7:00pm PDT
the overhang in the united states. how does that cloud an investor's decision how they make money decisions? >> it's clear that the whole greek thing is going to fall apart, and no one knows exactly how, when or what falling apart really means for spain. no one is worried about greece per se. they're worried about what greece means for spain. >> tom: we know it means a stronger u.s. dollar. the dollar continuing to increase, and commodity prices drop. >> remember, you don't need to be the best currency in the world, just the least worse. and that's where the u.s. dollar is right now. look further. why would anybody put money in dollars as a safe haven? but right now, liquid, easy to get in and out. >> commodity sold off, gold, oil. natural gas rebounds from $2 to 2.50. is this an energy area you're looking for bargains. >> i'm looking for a bottom in natural gas. i think we'll bounce to $3, and ?r somewhere in there for a long time. >> and you're looking at alter petroleum. they have natural gas exploration production, and share price is half of what it was last summer. is this a
PBS
May 27, 2012 5:00pm PDT
questioned by that, they just pointed to the united states and said, "look what the united states is doing." you know, indefinite detention. the patriot act. you know, increase surveillance powers. "if the united states can do it, they certainly can't criticize us." and this happened in a number of countries. so, you know, we knew we had to look to ourselves in order to speak to the world. so we began to work with the aclu, pen did, to put together these public readings from these documents. >> you can't believe some of these documents that they've uncovered. and, you know, in a way it's a tribute to this country that the freedom of information act actually works. that you don't actually need wikileaks. like, there is an actual legal way that documents that are quite damaging to the people who committed these acts of atrocity. >> that's something that the book really chronicles is that this was not a case where everybody agreed with these programs. on the -- >> with the torture? >> right. >> you mean, people inside government? >> absolutely. >> there were dissenters? >> in the military, an
PBS
May 15, 2012 3:00pm PDT
who obama has previously said and praised as being one of the best bankers in the united states. so the obama administration looks tough on banks. they're more than likely looking at what the company knew when they knew it and whether or not there's anything they're covering up right now. >> woodruff: dawn, you had something about a conference call that jamie dimon held with investors back in mid april. >> oh, yeah. jamie dimon on his analyst calls-- i've been covering the company about two nears years now-- on his calls he almost always cracks jokes and asks a stupid question. he always goes off on government regulation. in this that call in mid april when dimon says he didn't know how bad the trade was or didn't know that there was a problem was asked about it, he was uncharacteristically, you know, calm and quiet. he stuck to what seemed like kind of a scripted format. he was very, you know, he just wasn't himself. he wasn't himself on that call in mid april. that's after, shortly after everyone started reporting, you know, that particular division had a big problem. so, that cam
PBS
May 10, 2012 6:00pm PDT
backed by the united states, by israel, by gulf countries like saudi arabia and qatar and that all these countries have an interest in bringing down the syrian regime and that they're using terrorists to do so. the so the government's narrative is that there isn't a protest movement in the country. there's no grass-roots movement of people seeking their rights, seeking more freedoms but it's terrorists. and then there's the third possibility, right? that this is actually... this is actually a jihadist group that carried out this attack. there is a group that has surfaced in the last couple months that's got all the typical trappings of a jihadist organization. jihadist iconography, jihadist ideology online. they have claimed responsibility for some attacks in syriaened n recent months. they have not claimed responsibility for this attack but it is possible that they are behind today's attack. >> brown: what about the seeming target here? the military intelligence headquarters? is that even clear about what was the target? >> that is not clear. this attack did happen near a military
PBS
May 12, 2012 2:00am PDT
republican senator falls. >> serving the people of indiana in the united states senate has been the greatest honor of my public life. gwen: is the tea party back? and the mysterious double agent who foiled al qaeda. what did we learn? >> i can tell you that we should never, ever let our guard down. gwen: covering the week, john dickerson of "slate" magazine and cbs news. major garrett of "national journal." susan davis of "usa today." and pierre thomas of abc news. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens, live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week with gwen ifill." produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. >> to chart a greener path in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness o technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> align -- a line is a power this will thing. it connects
PBS
May 4, 2012 6:00pm PDT
of the year, job growth in the united states slowed again last month. the labor department revised upward the number of jobs created in previous months, but reported only 115,000 new jobs came on-stream in april. new jobs were added last month, but fewer than expected. and the unemployment rate dipped to a three-year low of 8.1%, but mainly because frustrated job- hunters stopped looking. speaking at a virginia high school today, president obama focused on some positive signs. >> after the worst economic crisis since the great depression, our businesses have now created more than 4.2 million new jobs over the last 26 months. >> woodruff: but the president did acknowledge that challenges remain. >> there's still a lot of folks out of work, which means that we've got to do more. >> woodruff: minutes after the april jobs numbers were made public this morning, the presumptive republican presidential nominee, mitt romney, appeared on fox news and criticized the president, calling the numbers very disappointing. >> we should be seeing numbers in the 500,000 jobs created per month. this i
PBS
May 23, 2012 12:00am PDT
mabus is here, united states secretary of the navy, he has had a long and varied career as a politician, diplomat and businessman, he served as governor of mississippi from 1988 to 1992, he was also former ambassador to saudi arabia and ceo of a manufacturing company. he played the pivotal role in u.s. defense policy in the obama shifts its focus to the asia pacific region i am pleased to have him here on this program for the first time, welcome. >> thank you, charlie, i am glad to be here. >> rose: we now know that this president has announced clearly the kind of shift to asia. how does that affect the navy and its role and its significance? >> well, this new defense strategy which the president announced in january, and which he was in intimately involved in crafting, and had a all of the joint chiefs, all the service secretary, secretary of defense very involved in this, it is mainly a maritime strategy and focuses on the western pacific and focuses on the arabian gulf region, both of which are maritime, entities, and it places, i think, additional responsibility on the na
PBS
May 20, 2012 5:00pm PDT
the united states. and that i see myself and my music standing shoulder to shoulder, in solidarity, with people, with the voiceless, the poor, the wretched, the people who don't have a chance to even reach that bottom rung of the ladder. and if my music can give them some voice, and if my songs can give some hope to their struggle, and that's been a good day at work. >> here in new york the other day, on may day, you led this group of guitarists. >> yeah. >> the guitarmy. as it was called. and you chose "world wide rebel songs" as the rallying cry. >> yeah. >> let's listen, because i want to know why you plucked that song from your arsenal. ♪ world wide rebel songs sing out loud all night long ♪ ♪ hang on man it won't be long world wide rebel songs ♪ ♪ from the hallowed pubs of ireland to nairobi's fallen slums ♪ ♪ in new york city open fire with the guitar, bass, and drums ♪ ♪ down in gaza down in fresno out your door and down streets ♪ ♪ are you gonna stand around? or are you gonna be free? ♪ sing! >> where did that song come from? >> the people that make
PBS
May 16, 2012 4:00pm PDT
last 30 minutes in the limelight was that he was the victim of a conspiracy led by the united states. >> a conspiracy was born, all systems put into motion, and here i stand today. i never stood a chance. >> the former liberian president once again insisted on his innocence, saying he would never have supported the rebels who committed atrocities. in stark contrast to guilty judgment, he said he had been working for peace in sierra leone. >> what i did to help bring peace to sierra leone was done with honor. >> his speech will not change what happened in the sierra leone capital in 1999. the former president of liberia help plan an attempted takeover by rebels. the widespread atrocities committed at the time included the amputation of innocent civilians limbs, murder and rape. the judges have left no doubt that they think charles taylor knew about these atrocities. >> in relation to an assessment -- in-line >> the prosecution has called for mr. taylor to be given 80 years in jail. the defense says that is excessive. vinyl sentencing will take place in two weeks' time. -- final sentencing w
PBS
May 17, 2012 4:00pm PDT
year. he was reelected in a vote held on tuesday. united states is suspending most sanctions against burma in response to reforms. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton will allow american companies to invest in burma, but an arms embargo will remain. and a chinese activist has given details of his torture and retribution they said they suffered at the hands of chinese authorities. the bbc has obtained the first interviews with his family members since he escaped from house arrest last month and fled to the american embassy in beijing, causing a diplomatic crisis. we have more from damascus. >> the human rights activist whose daring escape into the arms of american diplomats put china and america at loggerheads. for 15 days, he had been under guard at a beijing hospital. just how he managed to flee his illegal house arrest, and then adding dozens of guards watching him is becoming more clear. first, he had to scale the walls of his house. as he did, he fell and broke his foot. he head -- hid in a neighbor's pig sty and then late that night went to the river. he could not swim acros
PBS
May 29, 2012 4:00pm PDT
told to get out. britain and the united states were among others ordering syrian officials,. >> we will go on trying to increase international pressure on the regime. this is part of that. >> serious top diplomats and others at the embassy in london have been given seven days to leave britain. it is part of concerted worldwide exploration from many capitals designed to send a strong signal to president bashar al-assad. in damascus, the u.n. special envoy burned president -- urged president bashar al-assad to stop the killing. but the president denied having anything to do with the deaths. it didn't look like a meeting of minds. >> we are at a tipping point. the syrian people do not want a future to be one of bloodshed and division. yet the killings continue and the abuses are with us today. >> if the massacre is a tipping point, it could be to still greater violence. the regime has so far always calculated that its survival depends on overwhelming force, not on dialogue. >> for more on the diplomatic moves to isolate the regime, i spoke to the u.s. state department spokesman. i hav
PBS
May 9, 2012 12:00am PDT
then a united states senator. >> i like the way this clock is ticking. >> charlie: i'm just sitting there saying, oh, my god. how great it is to be bill bradley. you know? so congratulations for being bill bradley. >> my goodness. that's the nicest anything has said to me today. >> charlie: you get it all the time, don't you? >> no. >> charlie: if you walk out on to a basketball court. let's assume it's an empty gym. somebody throws you the ball. you are behind. out of 25, how many would you sink behind the key? >> i'd take five to warm up. then i think might sink out of the remaining 20 maybe eight. >> charlie: eight. and at your best, how many would you sink? >> well, when i was in high school, i would... had a routine where i had hit 25 in a row from five spots. >> charlie: before you would go home. >> if i get to 24 and i miss, i'm back at zero. >> charlie: that's what i mean. >> by the time i got to my last year with the knicks, it was 10 of 13 because the concentration went. >> charlie: really? >> when you concentrate, 25 in a row five spots, you're concentrating. the longer i
PBS
May 25, 2012 3:00pm PDT
up in arctic norway, everybody took fish oil to stay healthy. when i moved to the united states almost 30 years ago, i could not find an omega-3 fish oil that worked for me. i became inspired to bring a new definition of fish oil quality to the world. today, nordic naturals is working to fulfill our mission of bringing omega-3s to everyone, because we believe omega-3s are essential to life. >> at&t >> the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: memorial day beckoned today, and highways began to fill for the heavily traveled holiday. in much of the country, the weekend trips promised to be just a little bit cheaper this year. across the country, americans filled up and hit the road, taking advantage of a timely drop in gas prices. >> we're going to savannah beach. >> we
PBS
May 25, 2012 12:00pm PDT
have 16 companies, most of them in the united states, most of our sales are here. but we have global footprint in some of our businesses operating 150 different countries. those businesses i think are representative of most sectors of the economy. we don't participate in real estate or energy, so take that out. but a wid wide range of food see distribution, car rentals, a variety of different businesses and we have seen a recovery of modest proportion, i care deeply about the policies that will be passed, will be championed by the president and hopefully passed by congress. and i hope they are going to take on a more constructive tone towards business and be a pro growth set of policies. i recognize it is complicated, i recognize it is partisanship and recognize people got elected but i am concerned that in the noise, in the tornado of politics and unfortunately it has become a tornado, we are going to lose what is most essential to this country, which is the ability for individuals to band together, free association, free enter price, create businesses and create jobs. >> rose: from
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 155 (some duplicates have been removed)